Employers Forum is designed to assist employers with necessary knowledge and skills in the administration of labour laws in Tanzania

Employer.7. Do you know the Rule against Discrimination?

Introduction

Welcome to our forum today as we continue to share the diverse knowledge relating to the labour laws and practice. In the previous article we have dealt with a subject of child employment and its implications to the employer if violates the rules. Today, we are going to have an insight about the rule against discrimination.

What is discrimination?

Discrimination can be defined as the act of treating a person or particular group of people differently, especially in a worse way from the way in which you treat other people, because of their skin colour, sex, gender or any other quality.

The labour laws that are applicable in Tanzania prohibit any form of discrimination in the employment relations.

Rule against discrimination in employment

The ELRA under Section 7 (1) provides for prohibition of discrimination at work-place. The rule provides;

‘Every employer shall ensure that he promotes an equal opportunity in employment and strives to eliminate discrimination in any employment policy or practice’

The rule is very clear to the extent that the employer is required to demonstrate in promotion of equal opportunity environment to the workers despite their background or origin.

The law goes further to mandate the employer to register with the Labour Commissioner a plan to promote equal opportunity and to eliminate discrimination in the work place.

Section.7 (4) provides that it is against the law for the employer to discriminate an employee on the following grounds;

  • Colour
  • Nationality
  • Tribe or place of origin
  • Race
  • National extraction
  • Social origin
  • Political opinion or religion
  • Sex
  • Gender
  • Pregnancy
  • Marital status or family responsibility
  • Disability
  • HIV/Aids
  • Age; or
  • Station of life

Moreover, the law declares that any form of Harassment of an employee shall be a form of discrimination.

Exception to the rule of discrimination

The law also give a way whereby an employer is allowed to take some actions which are justified under the law and may not amount to discrimination as per Section.7 (6) of ELRA

  • To take affirmative action measures consistent with the promotion of equality or the elimination of discrimination in the workplace;
  • To distinguish, exclude or prefer any person on the basis of an inherent requirement of a job; or
  • To employ citizens in accordance with the National Employment Promotion Services Act.

Scope of employee or employer in discrimination

As far as discrimination is concerned, an employee meaning is not limited to a person employed by the employer but it goes beyond to include an ‘applicant for employment’. Also an employer it includes an ‘employment agency’.

Therefore, the prohibition of discrimination in employment policy or practice it covers areas such as recruitment procedures, advertising and selection criteria, appointments and the appointment process, job classification and grading, remuneration, employment benefits and terms and conditions of employment, job assignments, the working environment and facilities, training and development, performance evaluation systems, promotion transfer, demotion, termination of employment and disciplinary measures.

Employers are advised therefore to be cautious on how to handle not only the employees but also the potential employees and avoid all forms of discrimination.

Yours,

Isaack Zake, Esq.Isaack Zake an Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania, he is passionate in pursuing matters in relation to labour and Human Resource Management and has been labour lawyer practitioner at various areas of practice such as FIBUCA Trade Union, Commission for Mediation and Arbitration, Labour Court of Tanzania and Labour Office at the Ministry of the Labour Affairs. Mr. Isaack is also a founder of www.ulizasheria.co.tz a blog that offers legal education to the public but also specifically to the labour stakeholders who has been able to publish more than 70 articles relating to labour laws in Swahili.

Mr. Zake is also working with the legal team of Tanzania Association of Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Mining Employers (TAACIME) an Employer’s Association. You are all welcome to join TAACIME for advocating employer(s) rights.

For more information, questions and suggestions please contact0713 888 040 or 0787 466 687 with email taacimeinfo@gmail.com

Employer.6. Do you know the punishment for child employment?


Introduction

Welcome to our forum today as we continue to share the diverse knowledge relating to the labour laws and practice. In the previous article we have discussed on areas that employers are not allowed to employ any child under 18 years. Today we are going to explore the possible punishment for violation rules against child employment.

Offence on Child employment

Section 5 (7) of the ELRA provides for an offence to child employment

‘(7) it is an offence for any person –

  • to employ a child in contravention of this section;
  • to procure a child for employment in contravention of this section

the law has prohibited employers to employ children under 14 years and also children under 18 years to hazardous conditions as discussed in the previous article. If the employer or any person who procures a child under age or engage a child in hazardous conditions then is committing an offence which is punishable under the Employment and Labour Relations Act.

As a society we have witnessed a great number of children employment to various sectors or working conditions that are not in relation or proportion to their age. We have seen that in agricultural sector, mining, fishery, service sector or construction sector. We must adapt the changes and live to the standard provided by the Labour Laws.

Why then employers employ children?

There are many reasons ascribed to child employment, however one of the major reason is that children are cheap labour. Most employers avoid to employ adult because they have power to negotiate their earnings than children.

Mostly children employment has been among our houses, when we hire children to look after our homes. Most of these are standard 7 leavers who could not proceed with secondary education. It is important to note that most of these are in their early teens like 13 to 15. It is against the law.

Also we have witnessed, children involvement in street begging with adults using them. These children are so young even from 2 years – 10 years who are suppose to be at home playing or at nursery school but are on high ways begging. The society ought to take action against this malpractice and violation of children rights to proper education and health life.

Punishment for Child employment

If a person is convicted for child employment or procuring a child for employment then such person can be sentenced to fine not exceeding 5 million or imprisonment for a term of 1 year or both.

In any case as to whether an employed person is a child or not, the burden of proof lies to the employer and not to the child or prosecution.

The employer has to be careful before making arrangement with an employee so as to ascertain the age of the employee. To be safe for the employers, they must not engage children or persons under age in any employment that is hazardous.

Yours,

Isaack Zake, Esq.

Isaack Zake an Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania, he is passionate in pursuing matters in relation to labour and Human Resource Management and has been labour lawyer practitioner at various areas of practice such as FIBUCA Trade Union, Commission for Mediation and Arbitration, Labour Court of Tanzania and Labour Office at the Ministry of the Labour Affairs. Mr. Isaack is also a founder of www.ulizasheria.co.tz a blog that offers legal education to the public but also specifically to the labour stakeholders who has been able to publish more than 70 articles relating to labour laws in Swahili.

Mr. Zake is also working with the legal team of Tanzania Association of Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Mining Employers (TAACIME) an Employer’s Association. You are all welcome to join TAACIME for advocating employer(s) rights.

For more information, questions and suggestions please contact0713 888 040 or 0787 466 687 with email taacimeinfo@gmail.com

Employer.5. Don’t employ a child under these conditions


Introduction

Welcome to our forum today as we continue to share the diverse knowledge relating to the labour laws and practice. In the previous article we have introduce the rule against Child Employment. We have dealt with general rule of not employing children under 14 years and some exception to the rule for employing children of 14 years and above. In today’s article we are going to look upon conditions that employers are prohibited to employ children under 18 years.

Child defined

Section 4 of the ELRA defines a child to mean

‘a person under the age of 14 years; provided that for the employment in hazardous sectors,  child means a person under the age of 18 years;

The definition of a child as far as the employment is concerned is a person under 14 years, means any person of 14 years can be employed. However, as far as condition of employment is concerned for hazardous sectors a child is any person below 18 years.

The law has stated clearly the hazardous sectors for which a child or person below the age of 18 years is not allowed to be employed.

The Employment and Labour Relations (General) Regulations, G.N. No.47 of 2017 listed hazardous work for children

Agriculture

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years

to planting, weeding, applying pesticides, prepare seed beds, pruning, harvesting and sorting, operating farm machinery and driving farm vehicle.

Fishery

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years

Placing and hauling fishnet, repairing fishnets, sorting fish or carrying fish baskets, cooking, carrying ice blocks, fish salting and drying, deep sea fishing etc

Mining and Quarrying

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years on mining and quarrying to do the following;-

Shaft, drift or trench digging, carrying ore from shaft, drilling and blasting, crushing ore, grinding ore etc

Construction

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years on construction to do the following;-

Cement mixing, painting, brick making, trenching, carrying water, carrying bricks, excavation operation, demolition operations etc

Service Sector

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years on service sector to do the following;-

Preparing food, cleaning kitchen equipment and utensils, washing clothes, hauling market supplier, clearing equipment furniture and furnishings including toilets, maintaining outside area etc

Restaurants/Hotels/Bars/Guest House

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years on restaurants/hotels/bars/guest house to do the following;-

Utensils equipment cleaning, scrubbing floors, window cleaning, bed making etc

Service Sector – Community Service

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years on service sector – community services to do the following;-

Cobblers, electrical repair, auto repair, tyre repairing, laundry shops, tailoring shop, hair dressing saloon, barber shop, shoe polishing etc

Trade Sector

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years on trade sector to do the following;-

Carrying and selling merchandise in the street

Transport Sector

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years on transport sector to do the following;-

Auto repair workshops, service station, garage, carrying luggage, cleaning vehicles, loading goods into vehicle

Other Informal Sector

  • Do not employ a child under 18 years on other informal sector operations to do the following;-

Carpentry and fixture workshop, cotton ginning processing and production of hosiery goods, detergents manufacturing, jute textile manufacture and coin making, lime kins and manufacture of lime etc

The employer has to be careful before making arrangement with an employee so as to ascertain the age of the employee to be allowed to work on the above sectors and carrying the required duties.

Yours,

Isaack Zake, Esq.

Isaack Zake an Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania, he is passionate in pursuing matters in relation to labour and Human Resource Management and has been labour lawyer practitioner at various areas of practice such as FIBUCA Trade Union, Commission for Mediation and Arbitration, Labour Court of Tanzania and Labour Office at the Ministry of the Labour Affairs. Mr. Isaack is also a founder of www.ulizasheria.co.tz a blog that offers legal education to the public but also specifically to the labour stakeholders who has been able to publish more than 70 articles relating to labour laws in Swahili.

Mr. Zake is also working with the legal team of Tanzania Association of Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Mining Employers (TAACIME) an Employer’s Association. You are all welcome to join TAACIME for advocating employer(s) rights.

For more information, questions and suggestions please contact0713 888 040 or 0787 466 687 with email taacimeinfo@gmail.com

Employer.4. Do you know the Rule against Child Employment?

Stop Child Labour


Introduction

Welcome to our forum today as we continue to share the diverse knowledge relating to the labour laws and practice. In the previous article we discussed about the importance of knowing labour laws for an employer. Today, we are going to look to one of the rule that employer is duty bound to follow, thus rule against child employment.

Who is a child?

The definition of child depends on the particular law that a person need to apply. The Constitution of the URT of 1977 as amended, the law of Child Act of 2009 and the Employment and Labour Relations Act of 2004 defines who is a child.

Article 5 (1) of the URT Constitution of 1977 as amended provides for the Franchise ie persons who have attained the age of adult and able to vote

‘Every citizen of the United Republic who attained the age of eighteen years is entitled to vote in any public election held in Tanzania. This right shall be exercised in accordance with the provisions of sub-article (2), and of the other provisions of this Constitution and the law for the time being in force in Tanzania in relation to public elections’

Therefore, since any person who has attained the age of 18 years is considered an adult, then it follows any person below the age of 18 years is considered a child.

Again, the Law of Child Act of 2009 defines who is a child as per Section 4(1)

A person below the age of eighteen years shall be known as a child’

However, in the labour law context the term child has broader meaning depending on the application of the law.

Section 4 of the ELRA defines a child to mean

‘a person under the age of 14 years; provided that for the employment in hazardous sectors,  child means a person under the age of 18 years;

Therefore, it is important for an employer to understand the definition context of a child under employment relationship so as to adhere to the guiding rules regarding employment of a child.

Rule against child employment

The ELRA under Section 5 (1) prohibit any employer to employ a child under the age of 14 years. The rule provides;

‘No person shall employ a child under the age of fourteen years.’

This is an absolute prohibition against employment of children under the age of 14 years without exception.

However, Section 5 (2) of the ELRA gives an exception to the rule against child employment to the effect that a child of 14 years can be employed to perform some light tasks

‘A child of fourteen years of age may only be employed to do light work, which is not likely to be harmful to the child’s health and development; and does not prejudice the child’s attendance at school, participation in vocational orientation or training programmes approved by the competent authority or the child’s capacity to benefit from the instruction received.’

Moreover, a child under 18 years of age is prohibited to be employed under hazardous conditions as per Section 5(3) of the ELRA which provides;

A child under eighteen years of age shall not be employed in a mine, factory or as crew on a ship or in any other worksite including non-formal settings and agriculture, where work conditions may be considered hazardous by the Minister.’

Therefore from this rule against child employment, we can be able to understand the following;

  • Employers are prohibited to employ any person below the age of 14 years
  • Employers are allowed to employ children of 14 years only in light works
  • Employers are prohibited to employ children below 18 years under hazardous conditions.

From the foregoing analysis, the employers must be in a position to make a proper decision on who to employ and under what conditions. Also employer must ascertain the age of potential employee before making any arrangement of employment.

Please keep in touch with our Forum as we are going to look on the hazardous conditions that children below 18 years are prohibited to be employed.

Yours,

Isaack Zake, Esq.

Isaack Zake an Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania, he is passionate in pursuing matters in relation to labour and Human Resource Management and has been labour lawyer practitioner at various areas of practice such as FIBUCA Trade Union, Commission for Mediation and Arbitration, Labour Court of Tanzania and Labour Office at the Ministry of the Labour Affairs. Mr. Isaack is also a founder of www.ulizasheria.co.tz a blog that offers legal education to the public but also specifically to the labour stakeholders who has been able to publish more than 70 articles relating to labour laws in Swahili.

Mr. Zake is also working with the legal team of Tanzania Association of Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Mining Employers (TAACIME) an Employer’s Association. You are all welcome to join TAACIME for advocating employer(s) rights.

For more information, questions and suggestions please contact0713 888 040 or 0787 466 687 with email taacimeinfo@gmail.com

Employer.3. Is it important for Employer to know labour laws?


Introduction

Welcome to our forum today as we share the diverse knowledge relating to the labour laws and practice. Previously, we have discussed about what makes you or a person an employer. We have gone through the definition and some factors that can make a person or entity an employer. Today we need to go further and see the reasons behind for employers to know all about labour laws.

Employers Experience

Labour laws are the laws that regulate the relationship between employers and employees.

Some of the employers know nothing about labour law next to hiring and firing of the employees. Employers concentrate much on their business without taking consideration on the people they are working with for achieving the goals of the business. Employers need to change the perception from viewing employees as steps to reach their goals but rather as partners in business.

Importance of labour law for Employers

Knowledge of labour laws for the employer is indispensable given the current situation on the laws and practice in the labour industry. An employer without proper knowledge and skill of applying labour laws is about to suffer lots of problems.

It is important for an employer to be conversant with the labour laws for following reasons

  • Employers rights; employers have rights under the labour law just like the employees. It has been the employers complaints most of the cases as the labour laws are in favour of the employees, this is because employers do not bother to understand their rights.
  • Employers obligations; under the labour laws employers have duty towards the employees and the Government authorities. Duties of employers are confined in the labour laws, knowledge of the laws therefore is must for an employer to discharge the obligations under the law.
  • How to deal with employees; it is important for employers to have the necessary skills on how to handle employees actions and behaviour at workplace. The labour laws provides for the ways on how an employer can deal with the conduct of employees.
  • Offences and penalties; again failure to observe or comply with some of the provisions of the labour laws may attract punishment from the authorities. Most of the employers do not know that some provisions of labour law are criminalised and therefore breach of the same may attract imprisonment term or fine.

Therefore, an employer is duty bound to make sure that he is conversant with the labour laws and its application so as to avoid unnecessary problems in labour practice. Most of the employer’s problems can be prevented by simply adhering to the relevant laws in place at particular time.

Being a member of this Forum can avail the employer with opportunity to study and proper apply the labour laws in workplace.

Yours,

Isaack Zake, Esq.

Isaack Zake an Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania, he is passionate in pursuing matters in relation to labour and Human Resource Management and has been labour lawyer practitioner at various areas of practice such as FIBUCA Trade Union, Commission for Mediation and Arbitration, Labour Court of Tanzania and Labour Office at the Ministry of the Labour Affairs. Mr. Isaack is also a founder of www.ulizasheria.co.tz a blog that offers legal education to the public but also specifically to the labour stakeholders who has been able to publish more than 70 articles relating to labour laws in Swahili.

Mr. Zake is also working with the legal team of Tanzania Association of Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Mining Employers (TAACIME) an Employer’s Association. You are all welcome to join TAACIME for advocating employer(s) rights.

For more information, questions and suggestions please contact0713 888 040 or 0787 466 687 with email taacimeinfo@gmail.com

Employer.2. Employer without contract of employment.

Introduction

Welcome to our forum today as we share the diverse knowledge relating to the labour laws and practice. One of important issue to be settled in the outset of conducting business or any service is to understand your position in relation to the people you are working with. Previously, we have discussed about what makes you an employer and referred Section 4 of the ELRA. Today we are going to look on other circumstances which can still makes you employer even without a contract of employment.

Employers misguided perception

Most employers thinks that for them to be employers they must have a contract of employment with a worker or any other contract of engagement as defined under Section 4 of the ELRA.

Due to this reasons, some employers who do not wish to be recognised as employers escape the duty to issue contracts of employment to his workers as a means of escaping responsibilities that are attached to the role of employer.

The reasoning of many employers who do not issue contracts of engagement with their workers, is that, employees may not have any evidence to claim any reliefs towards the employer as there is no written documents. However, as we are going to explore in this article, failure to issue contracts of employment to workers is more detrimental to the employer than the employees.

 Employers, fail to understand that, the Laws relating to labour issue, puts a burden of proof to the employer on proving that there was non –existence of the employment relationship with a claiming worker.

Therefore, the labour laws being keen of the kind of employers who are not willing to issue contracts, have enacted some provisions for which raise a presumption of the existence of employment relationship with a worker even though there is no written contract.

Section 61 of the Labour Institutions Act Cap.300 provides some factors that can make a person to be employee of another person regardless any kind of contract that the parties have engaged themselves.

Remember, it is not necessary for all the factors to be proved but only one factor can make the relationship you have with that particular individual to amount to employment relationship.

These factors includes;

  • If an individual works under your instructions and control, such relationship is presumed to be an employment arrangement; or
  • If an individual hours of work are subject to your control or directions then you are presumed to be the employer; or
  • If an individual is working for an organization, then an organization is presumed to be the employer; or
  • If an individual has worked for you for average of at least 45 hrs per month for the past 3 months, then the presumption is the relationship of employment; or
  • If an individual depends on you economically for the service he/she renders for you, then it is presumed to be your employee; or
  • If you provide tools and equipment for work of that individual then it is presumed that you are the employer; or
  • If an individual only works for you and not to other person or organization, then it is presumed to be your employee.

One of the factors that appear herein above can justify the claim of a person against you for being his/her employer. Therefore, it is not prudent to escape the duty to issue contract of employment but rather it is wise to issue one, as you can be in a better condition as employer to determine terms and conditions of such contract rather than waiting for authority to determine such when the dispute arise.

Therefore, it is highly advised for employers who have not issued written contracts for their employees to issue one, as they can see evidently on one or more factors discussed here apply to them.

Failure to issue written contract is against the law as Section 14(2) of the ELRA provides

‘A contract with an employee shall be in writing if the contract provides that the employee is to work within or outside the United Republic of Tanzania.’

Yours,

Isaack Zake, Esq.

Isaack Zake an Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania, he is passionate in pursuing matters in relation to labour and Human Resource Management and has been labour lawyer practitioner at various areas of practice such as FIBUCA Trade Union, Commission for Mediation and Arbitration, Labour Court of Tanzania and Labour Office at the Ministry of the Labour Affairs. Mr. Isaack is also a founder of www.ulizasheria.co.tz a blog that offers legal education to the public but also specifically to the labour stakeholders who has been able to publish more than 70 articles relating to labour laws in Swahili.

Mr. Zake is also working with the legal team of Tanzania Association of Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Mining Employers (TAACIME) an Employer’s Association. You are all welcome to join TAACIME for advocating employer(s) rights.

For more information about TAACIME  contact e-mail  taacimeinfo@gmail.com

For more information, questions and suggestions please contact0713 888 040 or 0787 466 687 with email zakejr@gmail.com

Employer.1. What makes you an employer?


Introduction

Welcome to our forum today as we share the diverse knowledge relating to the labour laws and practice. One of important issue to be settled in the outset of conducting business or any service is to understand your position in relation to the people you are working with. Therefore, today we are going to answer this question as regard to who is an employer?

Definition of Employer

The Employment and Labour Relations Act, Cap.366, (ELRA) under Section 4 defines who is an employer as I quote;-

employermeans any person, including the Government and an executive agency, who employs an employee.

Therefore simply as defined under the Act, employer means any person who employs an employee.

This definition seems not to be clear unless we have a view of who is an employee. The term employee is also defined under Section 4 of the ELRA

Employeemeans an individual who-

  • Has entered into a contract of employment; or
  • Has entered into any other contract under which-
  • the individual undertakes to work personally for the other party to the contract; and
  • the other party is not a client or customer of any profession, business, or undertaking carried on by the individual;
  • is deemed to be an employee by the Minister under Section 98(3)

Therefore, upon the definition of who is employee, we are able to understand the meaning of who is an employer.

Employer therefore can be defined as

  • a person who has entered into a contract of employment with an individual
  • a person who has entered into a contract with an individual who works personally to a person (employer)

Therefore, it is important for a person to understand what amount to be an employer. It is not necessary to be working as an organization but natural persons can be employers also in the labour law context.

Understand your status as employer and then pursue your rights as the employer while honouring your duties towards the employees.

Yours,

Isaack Zake, Esq.

Isaack Zake an Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania, he is passionate in pursuing matters in relation to labour and Human Resource Management and has been labour lawyer practitioner at various areas of practice such as FIBUCA Trade Union, Commission for Mediation and Arbitration, Labour Court of Tanzania and Labour Office at the Ministry of the Labour Affairs. Mr. Isaack is also a founder of www.ulizasheria.co.tz a blog that offers legal education to the public but also specifically to the labour stakeholders who has been able to publish more than 70 articles relating to labour laws in Swahili. Mr. Zake is also working with the legal team of Tanzania Association of Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Mining Employers (TAACIME) an Employer’s Association.
For more information about TAACIME  contact e-mail  taacimeinfo@gmail.com

For more information, questions and suggestions please contact0713 888 040 or 0787 466 687 with email zakejr@gmail.com

Employers Forum

Let us meet in our Forum


Introduction

Employers Forum it is an on line forum designed for the Employers to be availed with all the information regarding the Labour Laws and Practice within United Republic of Tanzania. The Employers Forum is intended to cater for the challenges that have been facing the Employers in labour administration and the current trend of changes in labour law and practice.

The new regime of Labour laws for the past 10 years

The current labour regime started its course in 2004 when the new legislations of labour laws were enacted by the Parliament of URT. The major laws were The Employment and Labour Relations Act, No.6 of 2004 and The Labour Institutions Act, No.7 of 2004. It took about three years of preparation of the institutions to put the laws in operation. The use and application of the new labour regime took on its wheels in 2007 when the relevant machinery for its application was put into place. Hence it has been a decade now since the current labour regime has been in practice. Various lessons have been learned for employers who took up the challenges but for those who ignored the new labour laws, have experienced a lot of pit holes.

Again, the new labour regime has undergone various legislation changes from 2007 up to 2018 and hence the issue of new Revised Edition on two major Laws thus The Labour Institutions Act, Cap.300. R.E 2018 and the Employment and Labour Relations Act, Cap.366. R.E. 2018

The impacts of the new labour regime to the employer are as follows:

  • More awareness of the number of employees regarding labour laws compliance;
  • Strikes and various demonstration from workers;
  • The increase of number of labour disputes registered at CMA and the Labour Court;
  • The increase of involvement of Trade Unions at work place;
  • Increased interventions from the government forcing employers to comply to labour laws.
  • Offences and penalties for non-compliance with the Labour Laws

These challenges and many others have been, to a large extent, detrimental to many Employers than to the Employees. It is a fact that, though the laws have been in place for the past ten years of its application, still a great number of Employers commit the same mistakes and found themselves faced with the same penalties in one after another of the labour issues.

Challenges of Employers

The employers are faced with various challenges on the application and administration of the new labour laws, such as;

  • Lack of skills regarding the operation of the labour laws and their role in working environment. Personnel or the executive officers who deal with employment matters lack proper knowledge and skills regarding current labour laws and practices applicable to their daily activities.
  • Outdated perception on the position of Employer as regard of the position of Employees. The employer ought to treat the employee as partner in serving the public rather than master –servant relationship.
  • Lack of knowledge on the development of labour relations in the labour regime. Most of the employers once employs an employee never bother to know what is happening in labour world until the labour problems lands at the workplace. As we all know the law is not static, same applies to the application and interpretation of the labour laws before decision making bodies it evolves simultaneously.
  • Devoid of the proper advice on how to handle labour issues with the employee at work place before the matter has reached to the referral organs. This has been one of the big challenges as Employers who are acting without advice or rely on advice from a source that has little or no experience with labour issues.

Employer’s Forum  is well prepared to offer the required labour solution as it consist of great team with both profound knowledge and skills  on labour issues as far as employers and employees relationship at work place.

It is our task as a Forum, therefore, to assist an Employer not to enter into unnecessary labour disputes and provide proper management of labour with a view of increasing productivity in the organization.

Interactions

The Forum is open to all the employers who are willing to share the knowledge and challenges facing the administration of the labour laws. However, the moderators of the forum will be sharing number of issues at the forum such as

  1. Articles on Labour Laws
  2. Decided Cases on Labour Laws
  3. Questions  and Answers
  4. Labour Laws updates
  5. Labour Advise

We welcome all Employers who wish to participate in the Employers Forum

Yours,

Isaack Zake, Esq.

Isaack Zake an Advocate of the High Court of Tanzania, he is passionate in pursuing matters in relation to labour and Human Resource Management and has been labour lawyer practitioner at various areas of practice such as FIBUCA Trade Union, Commission for Mediation and Arbitration, Labour Court of Tanzania and Labour Office at the Ministry of the Labour Affairs. Mr. Isaack is also a founder of www.ulizasheria.co.tz a blog that offers legal education to the public but also specifically to the labour stakeholders who has been able to publish more than 70 articles relating to labour laws in Swahili. Mr. Zake is also working with the legal team of Tanzania Association of Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Mining Employers (TAACIME) an Employer’s Association. For more information about TAACIME  contact e-mail  taacimeinfo@gmail.com

For more information please contact0713 888 040 or 0787 466 687 with email zakejr@gmail.com